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New Evidence of Racial and Ethnic Disparities Among Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

VBCR - October 2017, Vol 6, No 4 - Lupus

 

Results from a new registry of Manhattan, NY, residents has revealed that Asian/Pacific Islanders and Hispanics of any race are more likely to be affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than people who are white (Izmirly PM, et al. Arthritis Rheumatol. 2017 Sep 10. Epub ahead of print).

“These MLSP [Manhattan Lupus Surveillance Program] findings are particularly important, given the few published studies on the prevalence and incidence of SLE among Asians and Hispanics in the US [United States],” said Peter M. Izmirly, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, New York University Langone Health, New York, and colleagues.

SLE is associated with numerous manifestations, including some that are potentially life-threatening. The MLSP is a population-based registry established in 2009 to identify cases of SLE among Manhattan residents, and to ascertain accurate estimates of disease prevalence, especially among Hispanic and Asian patients, as data of SLE occurrence among these populations is lacking.

To form their registry, Dr Izmirly and colleagues reviewed the electronic health records of Manhattan residents from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2009. They selected this geographic location because of its ethnic and racial diversity, and because patients who live in Manhattan generally stay within this county to receive healthcare services, facilitating access to their medical rec­ords. Patients with SLE were identified using American College of Rheumatology and Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics criteria.

Dr Izmirly and colleagues reported that the age-standardized prevalence and incidence rates of SLE per 100,000 person-years were 62.2 and 4.6, respectively. In addition, SLE rates were approximately 9 times higher in women than in men in terms of prevalence (107.4 vs 12.5, respectively) and incidence (7.9 vs 1.0, respectively).

Age-standardized prevalence rates of SLE were 210.9 among non-Hispanic black women, 138.3 among Hispanic women, 91.2 among non-Hispanic Asian women, and 64.3 among non-Hispanic white women. These rates followed a similar pattern among men—26.7 among non-Hispanic black men, 19.4 among Hispanic men, 14.2 among non-Hispanic Asian men, and 3.7 among non-Hispanic white men.

Age-standardized incidence rates of SLE among non-Hispanic black women, non-Hispanic Asian women, Hispanic women, and non-Hispanic white women were 15.7, 6.6, 6.5, and 6.5, respectively. Similarly, these rates were 2.4, 1.3, 0.5, and 0.5 for non-Hispanic black men, Hispanic men, non-Hispanic Asian men, and non-Hispanic white men, respectively.

“Our analysis confirms evidence of a higher prevalence of SLE among non-Hispanic blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites and adds evidence of a higher prevalence of SLE among Hispanics and non-Hispanic Asians,” Dr Izmirly and colleagues concluded.

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Last modified: November 30, 2017
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