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Interview with the Innovators

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a difficult cancer to treat as it is heterogeneous in nature. Each line of therapy pre­sents many choices for physicians and their patients, making it challenging to know which treatment is best for that particular patient. However, having “too many” choices may ultimately be a good problem to have, and research is under way to provide answers for those in this community in need of direction. The current era in MM might be seen as the beginning of a “golden age” of sorts for those in MM research and drug development, with new options for patients on the horizon.
The current generation of oncologists has witnessed great advances in our understanding of tumor biology and biomarkers linked to treatments. Those advances started with research, but disseminating this information can be difficult given the myriad of obstacles in adoption to practice. The science behind these advances is fascinating and excites those in medicine with the possibility of providing meaningful, life-altering care to patients. But still there exists the reality of the vetting of each new discovery, starting with niche use among the early users, before it gets adopted more broadly.
Dr. Boccia addresses the problem of unclear diagnoses affecting approximately 15% of newly diagnosed patients with metastatic disease each year and the importance of an accurate diagnosis of tumor type in selecting the proper site-specific therapies.
Dr. Boccia describes the components of the bioT3 platform and its clinical utility in identifying tumor type and actionable targets for therapy.
Dr. Boccia compares CancerTYPE ID to other gene expression tests and reviews studies validating its accuracy and clinical utility.
Dr. Boccia describes cases in which he uses CancerTYPE ID in his clinical practice.
Dr. Boccia describes cases in which he uses CancerTREATMENT NGS+ in his clinical practice.
Dr. Boccia talks about the importance of controlling costs in the current environment and how the bioT3 testing approach can help compared to other options.
Dr Stephen C. Malamud and Dr Susan K. Boolbol discuss the circumstances in which they would use the Breast Cancer IndexSM (BCI) to assist in determining whether to extend the adjuvant therapy of women with breast cancer beyond 5 years.
Dr Stephen C. Malamud and Dr Susan K. Boolbol consider the clinical utility of the Breast Cancer IndexSM (BCI) as a test that separates those patients who are more likely to benefit from those who are unlikely to benefit from extended endocrine therapy.
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Results 1 - 10 of 14
  • Rheumatology Practice Management
  • Lynx CME
  • American Health & Drug Benefits
  • Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Care in Myeloma
  • Value-Based Care in Neurology